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  • John Dowd Resigns As Trump's Lead Lawyer In Russia Probe news

    John Dowd resigned Thursday as President Donald Trump's lead attorney assigned

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 11:37:11 -0400
  • Protests Shut Down Sacramento Kings Game, Freeways Over Stephon Clark's Death news

    Outraged over the latest police shooting of an unarmed black man, hundreds of

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 00:49:40 -0400
  • DC's Cherry Blossom Festival delayed for anti gun violence March news

    Rachel Maddow reports that the opening of Washington, D.C.'s famous Cheery Blossom Festival is being delayed a day to accommodate the expected crowds participating in the March For Our Lives protest for new laws to prevent gun violence.

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 16:03:07 -0400
  • Austin Bomber Is A Terrorist Of Our Own Making news

    It's been a hell of a few weeks here in Austin, Texas, and the last one was

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 08:57:04 -0400
  • Man dies after reclining movie theater seat closes on his head news

    A man in Birmingham, England, died after he reportedly got his head trapped in

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 10:20:42 -0400
  • Surveillance video shows Vegas gunman methodically bringing suitcases of weapons to hotel room news

    In the week before the Las Vegas mass shooting, Stephen Paddock brought at least 21 suitcases to his room at the Mandalay Bay hotel as he gradually amassed 23 guns and thousands of rounds of ammo.

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 11:59:40 -0400
  • Taiwan says should educate its youth on dangers of China news

    Taiwan should educate its youth about the risks presented by China where there is neither freedom nor democracy, Taiwan's main body in charge of policy making toward its giant neighbor said on Friday. China has been increasing its efforts to win over young Taiwanese, a key demographic to reach out to amid souring political relations between Beijing and Taipei, including offering incentives to set up businesses in China. China claims Taiwan as its sovereign territory and considers people from the self-ruled island to be Chinese citizens.

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 06:15:33 -0400
  • Smoky condo fire in Vietnam kills at least 13, injures 28 news

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Residents startled awake by loud noise and smoke signaled for help with lit mobile phones and crawled onto cranes from their balconies to escape a fire Friday at a large condominium complex in southern Vietnam's Ho Chi Minh City. At least 13 people were killed and 28 injured, with police saying it was unclear if anyone was missing.

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 04:34:46 -0400
  • In photos: Damien Hirst unveils 'Colour Space' paintings in UK

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    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 11:18:15 -0400
  • GOP lawmaker knocks Trump for Putin call but refuses to distance himself from president news

    A top Republican on the House Intelligence Committee chastised President Trump for congratulating Russian President Vladimir Putin on his reelection — but then refused to distance himself from Trump.

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 09:52:04 -0400
  • Here Are 6 Of John Bolton's Most Belligerent Op-Eds In Recent Years news

    President Donald Trump named John Bolton, the former U.S. ambassador to the

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 22:24:13 -0400
  • Waterslide That Decapitated 10-Year-Old Boy Was a 'Deadly Weapon,' Indictment Says news

    (KANSAS CITY, Mo.) — A Kansas waterslide hyped as the world's highest was a "deadly weapon" that had already injured more than a dozen people…

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 19:44:16 -0400
  • Spending Bill Would Prevent Employers From Pocketing Workers' Tips news

    WASHINGTON ― Tucked into the $1.3 trillion spending bill unveiled by

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 12:07:31 -0400
  • The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is up to 16 times more massive than thought news

    The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP), a massive area of floating plastic debris that is more than twice the size of Texas, contains about 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic. This is between 4 and 16 times the mass of plastic that scientists previously estimated.  What's worse is that the amount of plastic within this area is growing "exponentially," according to a comprehensive three-year-long study using 30 vessels and a high-tech reconnaissance aircraft.  The study, published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports, provides a detailed analysis of the size and types of plastic caught up in the Garbage Patch, which occupies about 1.6 million square kilometers, or 617,763 square miles, between Hawaii and California.  SEE ALSO: A floating 'island of trash' has surfaced in the Caribbean The GPGP is just one of five ocean garbage patches that have developed around the world as people use more and more plastic, which is not biodegradable and is used for everything from water bottles to shipping crates. A fleet of 30 vessels, each dragging nets behind them to scoop up pieces of plastic, gathered 1.2 million samples. Scientists from The Ocean Cleanup Foundation in the Netherlands, as well as six universities and an aviation sensor company, used the samples they'd gathered to build a model of how plastic is transported in and out of the GPGP.  The study estimates that the approximately1.8 trillion pieces of plastic within the GPGP weighs about 80,000 metric tons. Another unexpected finding: Most of this mass — 92 percent — is composed of large plastic debris, such as crates and bottles, while just 8 percent or so of the mass is made up of microplastics, pieces smaller than 5 millimeters in size.  Modeled mass concentration of plastic in the Great Pacific Garbage PatchImage: THE OCEAN CLEANUP FOUNDATION/lebreton et. al. scientific reports."We were surprised by the amount of large plastic objects we encountered," said Julia Reisser, chief scientist of the expeditions, who works for The Ocean Cleanup Foundation, in a press release.  At least 46 percent of the mass was composed of ghostnets, or fishing nets drifting at sea, unmoored from the ships that once towed them, the study found.  “There’s a lot more plastic out there than thought,” said Boyan Slat, a co-author of the study and founder of The Ocean Cleanup Foundation, in an interview. Unlike earlier studies, which focused on collecting small pieces of plastic within a smaller area of the GPGP, this one attempted to capture the full range of debris floating in the GPGP. The armada of research ships used small nets to catch the small pieces, large ones to wrangle the medium-to-large pieces, and a C-130 Hercules aircraft equipped with LIDAR equipment in order to detect "these mega-pieces” of larger than 1 meter, Slat said.  Using their transport model, the researchers pointed to Asia as a main source of plastic pollution for the GPGP, particularly Japan and China, though plastics from North America contribute to it as well. Plastics that get routed into the Garbage Patch by winds and ocean currents are likely to be permanently trapped there, in a zone of little wind and devoid of weather systems that would break up and disperse the debris. Eventually, some of the surface plastic does sink to the ocean bottom, where it can endanger marine life.  A styrofoam buoy collected during the 2015 ocean surveyImage: the ocean Cleanup Foundation.The researchers used an "apples to apples" comparison of small plastic pieces, dating back to 1970, to analyze their mass estimates against previous studies, Slat said. The conclusion was inescapable: There is more and more plastic being added to the Garbage Patch each year, with far less plastic escaping, to the point where it's undergoing exponential growth.  This May, scientists and engineers affiliated with The Ocean Project plan to test out technology to clean up plastic from the sea, using a vessel off the California coast. The eventual plan is for the group to reduce plastic pollution by cleaning up the GPGP and similar areas of plastics around the world.  The nearly $40 million initiative relies on private funding; since 2013, they'd been raising funds using crowdfunding. Now, according to Slat, the group relies on a group of anonymous philanthropists, split about equally between Silicon Valley and Europe. One prominent investor is Marc Benioff, the founder and CEO of Salesforce, Slat said.  “We need to understand how much plastic is out there so that we can clean it up,” Slat said. The goal is to have the first plastic from the Garbage Patch recovered and back in port before the end of this year, Slat said. On its website, the foundation says its goal is to clean up 50 percent of the GPGP recovered within five years of deployment. WATCH: 'Supercolony' of 1.5m penguins discovered in Antarctica

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 16:30:57 -0400
  • Police officers save life of choking baby in body camera footage news

    A police body camera captured the moment two officers saved the life of a two-month-old girl who was choking on milk. Officers Ryan Sidders and Alex Oklander rushed to help the baby, who had stopped breathing, after noticing her mother in distress at the roadside in Ohio. In the footage, Mr Oklander is seen pulling the baby out of her car seat as his partner is heard saying “she’s choking”.

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 09:01:28 -0400
  • Miccosukee tribe seizes non-native dad's newborn in hospital news

    MIAMI (AP) — A tribal court for a sovereign Indian nation in Florida ordered the return of an infant Thursday that was taken from her parents, a Miccosukee mother and a white father, at a Miami-area hospital.

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 20:04:29 -0400
  • Retired 4-Star General: 'Simply Outrageous' That Jared Kushner Represents America news

    Retired four-star Army Gen. Barry McCaffrey did not mince his words on

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 05:35:54 -0400
  • Roseanne Barr’s outburst on ‘Kimmel’ wins cheers news

    “I’ve always liked Roseanne, she holds nothing back.” “Finally someone on a talk show with a dissenting opinion.” After her headline-making appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live, Rosie’s got Newsroom commenters talking — and applauding. Things got a bit awkward during the Thursday appearance. Barr, who voted for President Trump (and makes no apologies), shut down the late-night host after he questioned her political views. A defiant Roseanne replied: “A lot of us, no matter who we voted for, we don’t want to see our president fail.” Then came the bleeps: “Because we don’t want [Mike] Pence! Are you f***ing kidding me? You want Pence? You want Pence for the freaking president? Well, then, zip that f***ing lip.” Newsroom has her back. See the video above for more responses. Kimmel and Barr’s little debate ended with some laughs, and the two agreeing to disagree. What do you think of Roseanne Barr’s outburst? Join the conversation in Newsroom.

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 17:02:14 -0400
  • Too old for 2020? Trump, Biden, Bernie and the politics of age news

    Will young voters, mobilized by the movement that has sprung up in response to the high school shooting in Parkland, Fla., turn out for candidates well into their 70s?

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 05:00:55 -0400
  • These are the world's best airports of 2018 news

    With sunflower and butterfly gardens, rooftop swimming pool, free foot massages, and a newly introduced fully automated check-in and boarding process, Singapore's Changi Airport has nabbed the title of world's best airport for the sixth year in a row. 

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 06:53:58 -0400
  • Former Mormon Missionary Center Leader Accused Of Sexual Assault news

    Years-old sexual abuse allegations against a former Mormon missionary leader

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 19:07:37 -0400
  • Syrian Kurdish leader condemns Russia for Turkey 'green light' in Afrin news

    A prominent Syrian Kurdish leader on Thursday criticised Russia for giving a "green light" to Turkey to carry out an offensive in Syria's Afrin region, saying it wouldn't have happened without Moscow's approval. Turkish troops and allied Syrian forces seized control of the northwestern city of Afrin from the Kurdish People's Protection Units (YPG) militia on Sunday. In an interview with AFP during a visit to Stockholm, Saleh Muslim, the former co-chair of the main Syrian Kurdish political movement, the Democratic Union Party (PYD) said Turkey wouldn't have succeeded without Russian backing.

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 14:34:05 -0400
  • Shark alert as more than 130 beached whales die in Western Australia news

    At least 135 short-finned pilot whales died after a mass beaching in Western Australia - with fears the carcasses will attract sharks - as rescuers worked to herd those still alive back out to sea. The stranding of 150 whales at Hamelin Bay, around 195 miles south of Perth, was spotted by a commercial fisherman at daybreak. Locals and tourists are being warned to stay out of the water due to a likely increase in sharks attracted by the dead whales. Western Australia state’s Parks and Wildlife Service said its staff were on site and assessing the health and well-being of the 15 still alive. "Most of the whales beached themselves on dry land overnight and have not survived," said incident controller Jeremy Chick who added they they were awaiting support and equipment to help in a rescue attempt." Stranded whales on the beach at Hamelin Bay Credit: REUTERS He added: "The strength of the animals and the windy and possibly wet weather conditions will affect when and where we attempt to move them out to sea. "The main objectives are to ensure the safety of staff and volunteers as well as the whales’ greatest chance of survival." Melissa Lay, manager at the Hamelin Bay Holiday Park, told Reuters on the phone that it was the second masse stranding she had witnessed during her 15 years in the area. "There are some that are still alive but barely," Lay said. "The last time it happened, none survived." Locals and tourists were being warned to stay out of the water due to a likely increase in sharks attracted by the dead whales. People there for the peak salmon fishing season were also advised to stay out of the shallows. When they beach, short-finned pilot whales do so en masse as they travel in their hundreds Credit: Reuters "It is possible the dead and dying animals will act as an attractant, which could lead to sharks coming close into shore along this stretch of coast," the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development said in a statement. It added: "While it's not uncommon for sharks to be present off the Western Australian coast throughout the year, people should exercise additional caution until the stranding incident is resolved." Short-finned pilot whales inhabit tropical and subtropical waters and are often seen in the hundreds and when they beach, it is usually en masse. The stranding happened at Hamelin Bay, around 200 miles south of Perth The reason why mass strandings occur is still unknown. There are many theories including the shape of the coastline being a contributing factor, whales responding to distress calls from other whales, or groups following a leader into shore. The largest mass stranding in Australia’s west was at Dunsborough in 1996 when 320 long-finned pilot whales came ashore. All but 20 survived.

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 05:18:40 -0400
  • These Are The Biggest Marches In U.S. History news

    On Feb. 14, a lone gunman entered the halls of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 17:04:53 -0400
  • Lone Nigerian captive refused to convert for Boko Haram news

    LAGOS, Nigeria (AP) — The mother of the only Nigerian schoolgirl still in Boko Haram captivity after the extremists released 104 classmates said Thursday her daughter was blocked from boarding the vehicle to freedom and told to convert to Islam.

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 16:04:41 -0400
  • 13 Most Reliable Cars On The Road

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    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 12:56:20 -0400
  • Mark Zuckerberg Says He May Never Be 'The Right Person' To Testify Before Congress news

    When will Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg agree to answer questions

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 15:09:59 -0400
  • Bolton is a fan of Islamophobe activist Pamela Geller news

    President Trump’s next national security adviser, John Bolton, wrote the foreword to a book by Pamela Geller, an Islamophobic activist and blogger.

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 13:06:02 -0400
  • Poles demonstrate against tightening abortion law news

    Thousands in Poland demonstrate against government's new effort to restrict access to procedures. Rough cut (no reporter narration)

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 14:46:33 -0400
  • Investigators seek clues whether Austin bomber worked alone news

    Federal investigators were on Friday seeking clues about what motivated the 23-year-old man they say was responsible for the deadly Texas bombing spree and whether he had help building or planting his bombs. Mark Conditt, an unemployed man from the Austin suburb of Pflugerville, was behind bombings that killed two people and wounded five others over three weeks before he killed himself as police officers moved in on him on Wednesday, police in the Texas capital said. Police said Conditt confessed to the bombings in a 25-minute video made on his cellphone hours before he blew himself up.

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 05:22:25 -0400
  • If The Law Says Scott Walker Has To Call Early Elections, The GOP Will Rewrite It news

    A day after a judge said Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) was violating state

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 18:21:26 -0400
  • In court, oil company admits reality of human-caused global warming, denies guilt news

    On Thursday, in a packed federal courthouse in San Francisco, U.S. District Court Judge William Alsup donned a space-themed tie and listened as scientists and lawyers formally presented the fundamentals of climate science. The hearing, dubbed a "tutorial" by Judge Alsup, marked the first time a judge has ever asked for and heard a presentation of climate science for the purposes of deciding a court case. The case Alsup is presiding over involves several fossil fuel companies and two major cities — San Francisco and Oakland. The cities are suing the world's oil giants — Chevron, BP, Shell, and others — for extracting and selling fuels that the companies knew would stoke climate change and sea level rise.  Adapting to these changes requires massive infrastructure undertakings, such as building formidable concrete sea walls, and the coastal cities want Big Oil to pay. SEE ALSO: What you learn by giving 200 Senate speeches on climate change Judge Alsup gave each side two hours to present charts, data, and research on both the history of climate science and "the best science now available on global warming, glacier melt, sea rise, and coastal flooding."  Although Alsup made clear from the outset that the event was not a trial of climate science — but a climate lesson for himself — the evidence provided likely foreshadows the arguments both sides will make during the actual trial. While admitting the reality of human-caused global warming, lawyers for Chevron (the other oil giants have two weeks to tell Alsup if they agree with Chevron's science presentation) presented outdated science and repeatedly emphasized uncertainties about how fossil fuel emissions will affect global warming. They also presented climate change as a global problem requiring a global solution, foreshadowing a defense strategy of arguing that no single company should be held liable for climate change-related damages. "Oil companies basically went from a climate deniers playbook," said Kassie Siegel, director of the Climate Law Institute , in an interview . "They overemphasized and overstated really narrow issues of uncertainty about the effects of global warming." Glad I got here early! Big crowd for climate science hearing in SF today #ClimateTrial — Amy Westervelt (@amywestervelt) March 21, 2018 For instance, the oil companies' lawyer, Ted Boutrous, cited a U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report from 1990, which stated that the observed increase in global temperature could just be due to natural shifts in the planet's climate.  Nearly three decades have since passed, however, and confidence has grown about tying increasing temperatures to fossil fuel burning. A federal climate report published in late 2017, for example, found that there is no natural explanation for recent global warming.  "This assessment concludes, based on extensive evidence, that it is extremely likely that human activities, especially emissions of greenhouse gases, are the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century," the report said. "For the warming over the last century, there is no convincing alternative explanation supported by the extent of the observational evidence." As Don Wuebbles, a former White House climate science advisor and atmospheric scientist, said during the tutorial, 17 of the last 18 years have been the warmest years on record. The instrumental climate record began in the late 1800s, although researchers have far longer climate timelines gleaned from tree rings, ice cores, and other so-called "proxy" sources. While three climate scientists presented climate science basics for the plaintiffs, the defendants relied exclusively upon Boutrous, who has previously defended both Walmart and the Standard Fire Insurance Company before the U.S. Supreme Court, to inform the judge about the nuances of climate science. "I don’t know if Ted Boutrous has a background in climate science, but he has a background in spin," Siegel said. Alsup grilling Chevron on rate of change of sea level rise. Chevron says sea level has been rising for centuries, nothing new. Plaintiffs’ experts presented evidence that it’s dramatically increased in recent years, fueled by climate change. #ClimateTutorial @ClimateLawNews — Amy Westervelt (@amywestervelt) March 21, 2018 Chevron and the other oil companies may have a difficult time finding scientists who will, in a federal court, make scientific statements about climate change that oil companies find agreeable. "The oil companies are now in a real pickle," said Siegel, noting that climate scientists have previously made false or misleading statements on behalf of oil companies. Publicly, most of these companies now admit that climate change is occurring, even if they continue to sell more oil and gas that contributes to the problem.  "It's a lot harder to lie to the court under penalty of perjury," said Siegel. Richard Wiles, Executive Director of the Center for Climate Integrity, agrees. "The fact that Chevron’s lawyer, rather than an actual climate scientist, provided the court with its version of climate history suggests that the industry could not find a scientist willing to carry its water," Wiles said in a statement.  NASA satellite data observations showing sea level rise from 1993 to the present.Image: nasaOnly scientists, however, presented evidence for the plaintiffs. Along with Wuebbles, geoscientist Myles Allen, who leads Oxford University's Climate Dynamics Group, and Gary Griggs, a professor of earth sciences at University of California at Santa Cruz, presented climate science information to Alsup.  Griggs noted that significant sea level rise has been measured just miles from the courthouse near the San Francisco shore, and Allen delivered quotes from Svante Arrhenius, a scientist who in 1895 noted that carbon dioxide emissions could have a warming effect on the Earth. As for what comes next, the oil companies have filed a motion asking Alsup to dismiss the case. If this were to happen, there would be no trial, said Michael Burger, executive director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia University, via email.  But if things proceed, the next step will likely be discovery, wherein plaintiffs and defendants exchange information that will be used as evidence in the trial. During the past few years, as climate change-related litigation has increased, oil companies have gone to great lengths to avoid the discovery process, since it could reveal what oil companies knew about climate change, when they knew it, and what they told the public and their shareholders about it. The tutorial event may have been unprecedented, but the case is just one of many current lawsuits against oil companies. Across the country, New York City is also suing the same oil companies for damage caused by human-caused climate change.  “Taxpayers around the country should ask themselves whether they want to foot the bill for climate impacts that scientists now attribute directly to the oil and gas industry or demand that polluters pay for the damages they’ve caused," Wiles said. WATCH: 'Supercolony' of 1.5m penguins discovered in Antarctica  

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 11:10:38 -0400
  • Pennsylvania Supreme Court Chief Scolds His Own Party For Trying To Impeach Justices news

    The chief justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, a Republican, spoke out

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 16:31:01 -0400
  • Author of "The Dictator Pope" suspended as Knight of Malta news

    VATICAN CITY (AP) — The author of a highly critical book about Pope Francis, entitled "The Dictator Pope," has been suspended by the Knights of Malta lay religious order.

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 16:54:31 -0400
  • Petersen Automotive Museum to host ‘Outlaw’ Porsche Panel news

    Celebrating all things underground Porsche culture with a new 'Outlaw' panel, the Petersen Automotive museum will host craftsmen and icons from the Porsche Hot Rod world during an exclusive event

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 17:08:13 -0400
  • 2019 VW Touareg Adds Tech And Luxury While Slashing Weight news

    The most technologically advanced Volkswagen has arrived, complete with a 15-inch touchscreen.

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 05:26:18 -0400
  • Think twice about tariffs, President Trump. Cheap imports keep your voters afloat. news

    To the extent that Trump’s tariffs jack up prices on imports at the big retailers, we’re not just talking about an impact on household budgets. We’re also pulling at one of the few remaining threads that may be keeping our society from spinning apart.

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 05:00:13 -0400
  • Jim Carrey Appears To Shred Jared Kushner In Biting New Portrait news

    Jim Carrey has returned to Twitter with yet another politically-charged

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 06:14:22 -0400
  • U.N. rights experts urge China to provide care for rights lawyer news

    United Nations experts called on China on Friday to provide medical care to Jiang Tianyong, a prominent human rights lawyer jailed for inciting "subversion", amid reports of his deteriorating health. In a rare joint statement on China, six independent human rights experts voiced deep concern at the condition of Jiang, sentenced to two years jail last November after being found guilty of inciting subversion of state power.

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 05:34:04 -0400
  • In world first, Air India crosses Saudi airspace to Israel news

    Air India launched on Thursday the first scheduled service to Israel to be allowed to cross Saudi airspace, a sign of a behind-the-scenes improvement in ties between the Arab kingdom and the Jewish state. "It is the first time that there is an official connection between the state of Israel and Saudi Arabia," he said in Hebrew. There will now be three flights weekly in each direction, ending a decades-long Saudi ban on the use of its airspace for commercial flights to Israel.

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 16:52:18 -0400
  • The Latest: Mother: Unexploded bomb addressed to daughter news

    PFLUGERVILLE, Texas (AP) — The Latest on the investigation of the Austin bombings (all times local):

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 19:00:53 -0400
  • The Kris Kobach Voter Fraud Trial Was About Much More Than Kris Kobach news

    Since the year 2000, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach (R) has found 129

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 11:57:47 -0400
  • Fort Standard's Terrazzo Planters and Other Top Picks from the AD Design Show

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    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 14:42:08 -0400
  • Royal Caribbean picks up world's largest cruise ship news

    French shipbuilder STX handed over the world's biggest cruiseliner, the Symphony of the Seas, to US giant Royal Caribbean International on Friday ahead of its maiden voyage in the Mediterranean. The ship, which weighs 228,000 tonnes, is at 362 metres (1,188 feet) long just 20 metres shy of the length of the Empire State Building. It is marginally bigger than its sister ship, the Harmony of the Seas, which STX France delivered to Royal Caribbean in 2016.

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 13:09:42 -0400
  • 6 Real Ways We Can Reduce Gun Violence in America news

    America is the only developed country with such high rates of gun violence. Here are six steps we can take to reduce those numbers.

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 06:29:29 -0400
  • U.S. Drops Charges Against Turkish Security Accused Of Attacking American Demonstrators news

    The U.S. has dropped criminal charges against nearly all of the Turkish

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 20:58:35 -0400
  • Police chief on Iowa family's deaths in Mexico news

    Police Chief Paul Vermeer of Creston, Iowa, talked with reporters about the news that a local family of four died while vacationing in Mexico.

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 16:36:30 -0400
  • Venezuela oil workers clash with security officials in PDVSA cafeteria protest news

    By Alexandra Ulmer and Deisy Buitrago CARACAS (Reuters) - Angry Venezuelan oil workers demanding better benefits to counter crushing hyperinflation and food shortages clashed with security officials during a rare protest in the cafeteria of state oil company PDVSA's headquarters on Friday. Venezuela is home to the world's largest crude reserves but its creaking state-led economic model has all but collapsed, sparking four-digit inflation and long lines for everything from milk to medicines. Many struggling oil workers have kept mum for fear of losing their jobs and health insurance as President Nicolas Maduro's government takes an increasingly tough line on dissent.

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 15:31:53 -0400
  • Scores of Russian diplomats set to be expelled after EU leaders agree Russia 'highly likely' to have carried out Salisbury attack news

    Scores of Russian diplomats look set to be expelled from European capitals as ten EU countries indicated they were preparing to follow Theresa May's lead in the wake of the Salisbury attacks. France, Poland, Ireland, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Lithuania, Latvia, Denmark, Estonia and the Netherlands are all in discussions about deporting suspected spies after Theresa May shared intelligence about the nerve agent attack at a meeting of the European Council. Germany's Chancellor, Angela Merkel, has also hinted that she may be prepared to go beyond merely rebuking Vladimir Putin, and the EU recalled its ambassador to Moscow overnight in a show of solidarity with Mrs May. Throwing their weight behind the Prime Minister, the 27 leaders of the European Council said it was “highly likely” that the Kremlin was responsible for the poisoning of Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia. Responding to the announcement on Friday, Moscow accused the UK of leading the European Union towards an "anti-Russia campaign".  In a statement, the Russian foreign ministry said the only explanation was that European leaders "wanted to help the British Prime Minister out of a difficult situation". It came as Markus Ederer, the EU ambassador, was recalled from Moscow on Thursday night to consult with Brussels over the EU’s response to the attack, while a number of EU member states said they were poised to announce expulsions of Russian diplomats. While Dutch prime minister Mark Rutte said the move was a "measure" rather a "sanction" against Russia, the decision paves the way for further retaliatory action against the Kremlin which could see its European spy network dismantled within a matter of weeks. Meanwhile, a convoy of vehicles left the British Embassy in Moscow on Friday morning ahead of a Russian deadline for 23 diplomats to leave the country. A convoy of vehicles leaves the British embassy in Moscow on Friday morning Credit: Pavel Golovkin /AP Russia said it was expelling the diplomats last Saturday in a carefully-calibrated retaliatory move against London, which has accused the Kremlin of orchestrating the nerve toxin attack. On Friday morning, staff were seen embracing colleagues as vehicles were being readied on the grounds of the British embassy. Members of the British embassy staff gather at its compound in Moscow on Friday morning Credit: TATYANA MAKEYEVA /Reuters Leaving a dinner with European leaders on Thursday night, Mrs May said the Council was “standing together” against the growing threat posed by the Putin regime. "I welcome the fact that the EU Council has agreed with the United Kingdom Government's assessment that it is highly likely that Russia is responsible for the attempted murder that took place on the streets of Salisbury and that there is no plausible alternative explanation,” she added. "The threat that Russia poses respects no borders and it is a threat to our values and it is right that here in the EU Council we are standing together to uphold those values." On Friday morning, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov told reporters on a visit to Hanoi that the UK is "feverishly trying to force allies to take confrontational steps". Theresa May left a dinner with European leaders late on Thursday night  It came after five EU countries indicated they are prepared to follow Theresa May’s lead by expelling diplomats suspected of espionage. France, Poland, Lithuania and at least two other countries are understood to be in discussions about co-ordinated expulsions of Russian Embassy officials in the wake of the Salisbury poisonings. On Friday, Latvia said it would expel "one or several" Russian diplomats. The Czech prime minister Andrej Babis said it was "probable" his country would follow suit, with a decision to be made on Monday. Estonia is understood to be taking action. Irish PM Leo Varadkar said Ireland would conduct a security assessment of Russian diplomats, which could lead to expulsions.  It comes as Donald Tusk, the president of the European Council, said leaders of the 28 EU states agreed that Russia is likely behind the attack.  At a dinner with other EU leaders in Brussels, Mrs May warned her allies that Russia represents a “long term” threat to each of them and urged them to consider taking action either individually or as a bloc. #EUCO agrees with UK government that highly likely Russia is responsible for #SalisburyAttack and that there is no other plausible explanation.— Donald Tusk (@eucopresident) March 22, 2018 Following a meeting between Mrs May, the French President Emmanuel Macron and the German Chancellor Angela Merkel, French officials hinted that the country was prepared to act. Mr Macron and Mrs Merkel agreed on the importance of sending "a strong European message" to Russia. Dalia Grybauskaite, president of Lithuania, confirmed she was contemplating the deportation of Russians, and Poland’s deputy foreign minister Bartosz Cichocki told The Telegraph his country was prepared to act unilaterally in expelling Russians if it encouraged others to take steps against Moscow. The development is a huge victory for Theresa May Credit: WOLFGANG RATTAY/REUTERS EU leaders made a joint statement on Thursday night agreeing they stood in "unqualified solidarity" with the UK in a big victory for Mrs May. In a joint statement, they said: "The European Council condemns in the strongest possible terms the recent attack in Salisbury, expresses its deepest sympathies to all whose lives have been threatened and lends its support to the ongoing investigation. "It agrees with the United Kingdom Government's assessment that it is highly likely that the Russian Federation is responsible and that there is no plausible alternative explanation. We stand in unqualified solidarity with the United Kingdom in the face of this grave challenge to our shared security. "The use of chemical weapons, including the use of any toxic chemicals as weapons under any circumstances, is completely unacceptable, must be systematically and rigorously condemned and constitutes a security threat to us all. "Member states will co-ordinate on the consequences to be drawn in the light of the answers provided by the Russian authorities. The European Union will remain closely focused on this issue and its implications. "Against this background, the European Union must strengthen its resilience to chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear-related risks, including through closer cooperation between the European Union and its member states as well as Nato. "The European Union and its member states should also continue to bolster their capabilities to address hybrid threats, including in the areas of cyber, strategic communication and counter-intelligence. The European Council invites the European Commission and the High Representative to take this work forward and report on progress by the June European Council."

    Fri, 23 Mar 2018 05:35:08 -0400
  • Maryland school shooting victim has died news

    A teenage girl who was shot when a classmate opened fire inside their Maryland high school has died, authorities said Friday.

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